Can Tottenham's Stadium Capitalise On NFL Opportunity?


Tottenham Hotspur's new stadium took longer than anticipated to complete, but it promises to be one of the premier venues for sport for the next 20 years. The club took the gamble to leave White Hart Lane that was their home for 118 years. It served them very well indeed, especially during the most successful run in the club's history in the 1960s.

However, it was time for Spurs to move on to match the grandeur and the capacity seen across North London at the Emirates Stadium. After three years and a reported Β£1billion cost, Spurs officially moved into their new home on April 3, 2019, for their Premier League clash against Crystal Palace. The stadium not only offers a sense of comfort and a great atmosphere to supporters, boosting the capacity from 36,000 to 62,000, but also all the latest mod cons and technology for food and drink services.

The in-stadium wifi provides a seamless connection for fans on their mobile devices to check the scores from the other football matches around the country as well staying in tune with social media. It has already proven to be a huge success for Tottenham and their supporters, distancing themselves from the troubles that other clubs, especially West Ham United, have endured in moving from iconic venues of the past. The atmosphere played a key role in driving their quarter-final triumph over Manchester City in the Champions League.

Tottenham have developed into a global brand and their stadium along with their performances on the pitch will further enhance their reputation. However, the venue is not only being used for football. The NFL paid a small contribution towards the development of the ground, and as a result, a portion of the International Series games will be played at the stadium. It will begin when the Chicago Bears and the Oakland Raiders face off on October 6, while the Carolina Panthers and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers will play a week later.

The games have proven to be a huge success, selling out in under an hour on Ticketmaster. However, sustaining that enthusiasm will be crucial for Tottenham and the NFL over the 10-year period of the partnership. In contrast to the United States, football grounds are sold out around the country every weekend. The NFL remains a niche sport in the United Kingdom much like football is in the states with MLS. If you start comparing NFL to MLS, here are the biggest differences - the attendance figures of fans pouring into stadiums and the revenue generated off television rights.

The NFL is a moneymaking machine in the States, while stadiums, for the most part, are sold out. There are rare occurrences when matches are not sold out, averaging 60,000 plus at venues across the States. Compared that to the MLS where the average lies at around 26,000. There could be a comparison made between the two sports and the countries. In the International Series, matches played at Wembley Stadium have at times lacked the atmosphere and vigour of their counterparts in the States.

The games at Tottenham have the chance to make a statement and deliver the energy the NFL craves from the overseas market that could potentially result in a franchise being based in London. The next few years could be very important for Tottenham and their new stadium.



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